Archive for October 2015

Funny Movie Deaths that only Warped Film Writers could Think up   Leave a comment


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Posted October 30, 2015 by markosun in Uncategorized

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CF-18 Hornet Demonstration Jets with Super-Cool Paint Jobs   Leave a comment


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The CF-18 Hornets Demonstration Team of the Royal Canadian Air Force use different striking liveries year to year as they make stops at various airshows across North America. The paint schemes celebrate different anniversaries and milestones such as the 75th anniversary of the RCAF and the Battle of Britain. The paint jobs are extremely eye-catching.

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Here the CF-18 is shadowed by a NATO AWACS and CT-133 Silver Star.

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English/Anglais 409 squadron Demonstration Team pilot, Capt Adam “Manik” Runge, in the 2014 Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF) Canadian Fighter (CF) 188 Hornet demo jet on the 4th of April 2014 at 4 Wing Cold Lake. .  This years’ demonstration jet marks 2 milestones for the RCAF. It is the 60th anniversary of 4 Wing, Cold Lake, and the 90th anniversary of the RCAF.  The jet paint scheme was designed by Mr. Jim Belliveau, and unveiled at a ceremony in 409 squadron on the 27th of March.  Photo: Cpl Stuparyk, Image Data Systems (IDS), AETE AE2014-086-02

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Replica camouflage used by Spitfires during the Battle of Britain

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Boeing officials delivered the first production aircraft from the Canadian Forces CF-18 Modernization Program, Phase 1, to the Department of National Defense in a ceremony at Macdonald-Cartier International Airport. The Phase 1 program will modernize the fleet of 80 CF-18 aircraft to the specifications of newer models through avionics configuration upgrades.

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Posted October 30, 2015 by markosun in Uncategorized

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Modern Fighter Pilot Flight Helmets   Leave a comment


A flight helmet, sometimes nicknamed a “bone dome”, is a special type of helmet primarily worn by military aircrew.

A flight helmet can provide:

  • Impact protection to reduce the risk of head injury (e.g. in the event of a parachute landing) and protection from wind blast (e.g. in the event of ejection).
  • A visor to shield the eyes from sunlight, flash and laser beams.
  • Noise attenuation, headphones and a microphone (except when included in a mask).
  • A helmet mounted display, mounting for night vision goggles and/or a helmet tracking system (so the aircraft knows where the pilot is looking).

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SR-71 Blackbird pilot helmet. The plane flew so fast and high that the helmet resembles a space helmet.

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The Soviet (Russian) MIG-25 Foxbat also flew very high and fast.

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Chinese helmet variations

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U.S. Navy helmet

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F/A-18 Super Hornet carrier pilots

070525-N-0890S-021 PERSIAN GULF (May 25, 2007) - Lt. Cmdr. John Depree and Lt. j.g. David Dufault, both assigned to the "Black Aces" of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 41, go over pre-flight checks prior to launch aboard nuclear-powered aircraft carrier USS Nimitz (CVN 68). Nimitz Carrier Strike Group and embarked Carrier Air Wing 11 are deployed to 5th Fleet conducting maritime operations and supporting the global war on terrorism. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Apprentice David L. Smart (RELEASED)

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F-22 Raptor pilot helmet

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U.S. Marine Corp Harrier pilots always wear camo helmets

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U.S. Air Force Thunderbirds demo team

Mixed martial artist champion, Ronda Rousey, adjusts her flight mask in preparation for her Thunderbird F-16 Fighting Falcon flight at Nellis Air Force Base, Nev., Nov. 9, 2012. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Larry E. Reid Jr., Released)

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Royal Canadian Air Force

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F-35 Lightning II

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Each helmet costs $400,000!

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Vision Systems International (VSI; the Elbit Systems/Rockwell Collins joint venture) along with Helmet Integrated Systems, Ltd. developed the Helmet-Mounted Display System (HMDS) for the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter aircraft. In addition to standard Helmet Mounted Display (HMD) capabilities offered by other systems, HMDS fully utilizes the advanced avionics architecture of the F-35 and provides the pilot video with imagery in day or night conditions. Consequently, the F-35 is the first tactical fighter jet in 50 years to fly without a HUD. A BAE Systems helmet was considered when HMDS development was experiencing significant problems, but these issues were eventually worked out. The Helmet-Mounted Display System was fully operational and ready for delivery in July 2014.

The F-35 does not need to be physically pointing at its target for weapons to be successful. Sensors can track and target a nearby aircraft from any orientation, provide the information to the pilot through their helmet (and therefore visible no matter which way the pilot is looking), and provide the seeker-head of a missile with sufficient information. Recent missile types provide a much greater ability to pursue a target regardless of the launch orientation, called “High Off-Boresight” capability. Sensors use combined radio frequency and infra red (SAIRST) to continually track nearby aircraft while the pilot’s helmet-mounted display system (HMDS) displays and selects targets; the helmet system replaces the display-suite-mounted head-up display used in earlier fighters. Each helmet costs $400,000.

The F-35’s systems provide the edge in the “observe, orient, decide, and act” OODA loop; stealth and advanced sensors aid in observation (while being difficult to observe), automated target tracking helps in orientation, sensor fusion simplifies decision making, and the aircraft’s controls allow the pilot to keep their focus on the targets, rather than the controls of their aircraft.

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Posted October 30, 2015 by markosun in Uncategorized

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Waco, Texas Biker Gang Shootout video footage released   Leave a comment


This is why Norwegians refer to the term Texas as wild and unruly.

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Posted October 30, 2015 by markosun in Uncategorized

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Strange Brews   Leave a comment


Very strange brews indeed!

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Posted October 30, 2015 by markosun in Uncategorized

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If you want to convey a sense of lawlessness in Persian, Turkish or Norwegian, just say ‘Texas’   Leave a comment


PRI
By Ashley Cleek

In Norwegian, if you want to say something is totally out of control, you would say, helt Texas.

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“It means like it was ‘completely Texas,’” explains Emilie Klovning, a student at Columbia University in New York. Klovning says Norwegians use the phrase to describe a situation that is wild and chaotic, like a party or if people go crazy after a soccer match. ‘Completely Texas’ doesn’t have a negative connotation, it’s just the description of a situation that is the opposite of life in Norway.

“[In Norway] everything is very calm. People strive to control themselves, their emotions, not get carried away,” says Klovning. “And if that ever happens, if something feels chaotic or there are emotions spiraling out of control, or people are talking loudly, then we would say, it’s ‘completely Texas.’”

Texas is not just an adjective in Norwegian. The first time I noticed it was in Persian.

Inja Texas nist,” says my husband, Reza Jamayran, which translate as “it’s not Texas here.”

For Reza, and other Iranians, Texas symbolizes a chaotic place.

“A cowboy town, where there are no rules,” says Reza. “You could be dead anytime. You should be careful. You should not mess with scary, dangerous people.”

Iranian use the phrase, for example, if someone is driving erratically, “it’s not Texas here…” means ‘there are rules here, and you should follow them.’

If something violent happens in some neighborhood, Iranians might refer that part of town as “Texas.”

In Turkish there’s a similar phrase, burası Teksas değil, which means the exact same thing “It’s not Texas here…”

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While it’s easier to notice these turns of phrase in foreign languages, they occur in English too. It’s called metonymy —  using a word as a symbol for a bigger idea. When I was a kid, my mom would drive my brother to a lacrosse game across town, and she would complain that she had to,  “drive to Timbuktu and back.” I swear, for years, I thought Timbuktu was a suburb of Birmingham, Alabama.

So why specifically Texas?

“Texas is like the uber-United States,” explains Deborah Tannen, a linguistics professor at Georgetown University. Tannen thinks Texas acts as a stand in for an out of control place, because it’s both famous all over the world and still so foreign.

“I think the more exotic the source, the more flexible it’s meaning would be,” says Tannen.

And since Texas is foreign to Iranians or Norwegians, Tannen explains, it can stand in for things that are totally unacceptable in those cultures.

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“Maybe this very famous cartoon Lucky Luke,” he wonders. “He might be from Texas. Have you seen that one?”

I have never seen Lucky Luke. In fact, I doubt many Americans have. Lucky Luke was originally a comic strip written in French by a Belgian cartoonist way back in the 1940s.

Lucky Luke’s a good natured cowboy who keeps the riffraff off the streets of his Texas town. The comic was super popular across Europe, the Middle East, and Asia for decades. In the 1980s and 1990s Hanna Barbera, the producers of the Flintstones and the Jetsons, made an animated TV series. And that series was a centerpiece of my husband’s weekend cartoon-watching in Iran.

We found the Persian language version on YouTube, just like he used to watch.

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Lucky Luke is riding his horse across a pretty basic background of repeating cacti, a mesa. It’s all desert and saloon doors swinging. This was what Reza figured Texas looked like, until we went there.

We drove to Austin, Texas last year for a friend’s wedding. Of course, Reza didn’t expect shootouts or bandits, but still, he was surprised. “Because it’s something that you heard about your whole life and then you are there,” Reza says. “It’s surprising certainly, but I wasn’t nervous.”

When we arrived, he called his mom in Tehran to say he was in Texas. “I wanted to see what’s their reaction,” Reza laughs.”Would they say, ‘Be careful!’”

His mom wasn’t worried; I could hear her laugh through the phone. The same way my mom would probably laugh … if I called her from Timbuktu.

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Posted October 29, 2015 by markosun in Uncategorized

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Australian Accent Is All Down To Early Settlers ‘Getting DRUNK Every Day’   Leave a comment


Aussies slur their words and use only two-thirds of their mouth to speak because early settlers spent most of their days DRUNK, academic says

  • The Australian language developed because early settlers were often drunk
  • Academic claims the constant slurring of words distorted the accent
  • The average Australian speaks to just two thirds capacity
  • The drunken speech has been passed down from generation to generation


The Australian accent developed because so many early settlers were drunk and slurring, an Australian academic has claimed.

The first British arrivals to the country were such big drinkers that the distortion to their speech caused a verbal hangover that persists to this day, according to Dean Frenkel, a communications expert at Victoria University in Melbourne.

Proud Australians may be offended by the claim, which comes on top of the unavoidable truth that Australia began its modern life as a penal colony for our criminals.

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But academic Mr Frenkel unashamedly wrote in Australian newspaper The Age: ‘Let’s get things straight about the origins of the Australian accent.

‘The Australian alphabet cocktail was spiked by alcohol.

‘Our forefathers regularly got drunk together and through their frequent interactions unknowingly added an alcoholic slur to our national speech patterns.

‘For the past two centuries, from generation to generation, drunken Aussie-speak continues to be taught by sober parents to their children.’

Bemoaning the still ‘slurred’ Australian accent, Mr Frenkel continued: ‘The average Australian speaks to just two thirds capacity – with one third of our articulator muscles always sedentary as if lying on the couch; and that’s just concerning articulation.

‘Missing consonants can include missing “t”s (Impordant), “l”s (Austraya) and “s”s (yesh), while many of our vowels are lazily transformed into other vowels, especially “a”s to “e”s (stending) and “i”s (New South Wyles) and “i”s to “oi”s (noight).’

Concluding with a call for Australians to improve their diction, the academic added: ‘It is time to take our beer goggles off.

‘Australia, it is no longer acceptable to be smarter than we sound.’

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The Australian alphabet that ‘was spiked by alcohol’ and that the distortion to their speech caused a verbal hangover that persists to this day
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HISTORY OF THE AUSSIE ACCENT

1788 – Colonial settlement established. A new dialect of English begins to take shape

1830 – By the end of the early Colonial settlement era major features of the accent, called ‘General Australian’, had developed, wi the country’s love of abbreviated words became part of everyday language

1850 – The Gold Rush leads to internal migration, spreading the general dialect around the continent

1880 – Extensive migration from England led to an emphasis on elocution and British vowels, which formed the Broad Australian dialect

1914 to 1918 – Australia’s national identity was galvanized during WWI with the creation of terms like Anzac and digger. Australians start to become proud of their accent.

1950 – In the second half of the 20th century, any emphasis on Broad Australian dwindled because of weakening ties with Britain and the General Australian accent became widely accepted as the national norm

1964 – The term Strine was coined to describe the country’s accent, which the majority of people continue to speak today   

  • Information from Macquarie University and Oxford English Dictionary

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Previous accent theories have included suggestions that the Australian accent is a true reflection of the 18th and 19th century accents of British arrivals, while the American accent reflects the way 17th century early settlers from Britain spoke.

The suggestion has been that it is native English accents which have changed, while former colonies have clung to old ways of speaking.

Winston Churchill described the Australian accent as ‘the most brutal maltreatment ever inflicted upon the mother tongue.’

Aussie Drinking Slang

Words for “beer”:

  • grog (can mean any alcohol)
  • piss

Words for “drunk”:

  • legless
  • off one’s face
  • maggot (really drunk)
  • pissed

Different sized drinks:

  • schooner – 425ml glass of beer, except in SA where it is a 285ml glass
  • middy – half-pint of beer / same as a pot
  • pot – 285ml glass of beer in QLD or VIC
  • pint – 570ml glass of beer
  • long-neck – 750ml bottle of beer
  • tinnie – can of beer
  • stubby – bottle of beer
  • slab – 24 pack of beer

 

More drinking terms:

  • esky – a cooler
  • goon – cask or box wine
  • shout – to buy someone a drink
  • bottle shop / bottle-o – a liquor store
  • chunder – vomit
  • drink with the flies – drink alone
  • rage – party
  • skull/skol a beer – drink a whole beer without stopping

Posted October 28, 2015 by markosun in Uncategorized

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