The F/A-18’s of NASA   Leave a comment


line

nasax (2)

line

Three F/A-18 Hornet aircraft are flown at NASA’s Armstrong Flight Research Center at Edwards, California, for research support and pilot proficiency. The aircraft were obtained from the U.S. Navy between 1984 and 1991. One has a two-seat cockpit while the others are single-seat aircraft. NASA research support aircraft are commonly called chase planes and fill the role of escort aircraft during research missions.

Chase pilots are in constant radio contact with research pilots and serve as an “extra set of eyes” to help maintain total flight safety during specific tests and maneuvers. They monitor certain events for the research pilot and are an important safety feature on all research missions.

Chase aircraft also are used as camera platforms for research missions that must be documented with photographs or video. Aeronautical engineers monitor and verify various aspects of a research project by extensively using photos and video.

The two-seat F/A-18 support aircraft is normally used for photo or video chase. The aircraft is configured to transmit live video back to Armstrong so engineers can visually monitor the mission as it is flown. This feature greatly enhances flight safety.

The F/A-18 fleet is also used by Armstrong research pilots for the routine flight training and proficiency required of all NASA pilots.

line

nasax (3)

line

nasa1

 NASA F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV). NASA used the F-18 HARV to demonstrate flight handling characteristics at high angle-of-attack (alpha) of 65–70 degrees using thrust vectoring vanes.

line

nasa

line

nasa2

line

Some wild X-planes

nasa6

HiMAT -Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology

line

nasa3

line

nasa5

line

nasa4

X-29

line

nasazzz

.

Posted July 27, 2016 by markosun in Aircraft, Aviation

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: