Archive for the ‘Art’ Category

Harbin festival: China’s ice-and-snow city   Leave a comment


line

The northern Chinese city of Harbin is hosting its annual ice-and-snow festival – one of the largest of its type in the world.

harbin

line

harbin3

line

harbin1

harbin2

line

Eighteen couples braved the cold to get married at this year’s festival, before ice-skating together.

harbin5

line

harbin6


Posted January 7, 2017 by markosun in Art

Politico-Toons   Leave a comment


line

keg3

keg1

line

keg-done

keg2a

line

keg

keg-done1

keg6

keg7

keg9

line

keg8


Posted January 4, 2017 by markosun in Art, Politics

Churchtanks: Sculptures of Churches Turned Into Tanks   Leave a comment


Religion and war have always been mixing and closely related throughout history. Missouri-born artist Kris Kuksi took notice of this connection, repeating itself throughout history, and decided to unveil it in his Churchtanks sculpture series. By creating the juxtaposition between the classical world and the modern war gear, Kuksi transforms churches into tanks, blending the two structures smoothly and seamlessly.

line

churchtank22

line

As explained in his statement, creation of the sculptures is a “process that requires countless hours to assemble, collect, manipulate, cut, and re-shape thousands of individual parts, finally uniting them into an orchestral-like seamless cohesion that defines the historical rise and fall of civilization and envisions the possible future(s) of humanity.” Churchtanks thus represent the ability of art to fascinate and at the same time to raise awareness.

line

churchtank1

line

churchtanks

line

churchtanks1

line

churchtanks-facebook

Division between church and state.

line

churchtanks-kris-kuksi-5

line

churchtankss

line

Bank tank.

 

church-bank_tank_1email0


Posted December 29, 2016 by markosun in Art

The very colourful lunch boxes from decades past   Leave a comment


line

They don’t make lunch boxes, also known as lunch kits, like they did back in the sixties and seventies. The tin boxes which had a thermos inside were adorned with pop culture icons, TV shows, movies, sports heroes, historical events and many other topical subject matter.

The vintage lunch box as we think of it today was born in 1935. That’s when a Milwaukee, Wisconsin, company called Geuder, Paeschke, and Frey licensed the likeness of a new cartoon character named Mickey Mouse for the top of its oblong-shaped “Lunch Kit.” The metal container was sealed at the top with a loop of stiff wire that doubled as a handle.

From that moment on, placing a character of any sort on the side of a lunch box (or lunchbox, as it is often spelled) became the standard for the lunch boxes children toted to school. Before long, the signal a lunch box sent to your peers could mark you as a cool kid or a dork, depending on if your PB&J was packed inside a Mercury’s Space capsule Container (Universal, 1962) or a Evel Knievel lunch box (Aladdin, 1973).

Modern lunch boxes just don’t have the same eye-catching appeal of the old boxes. The lunch boxes today are more practical and cater to contemporary technology.

blox9

box25

box26

A three decker.

The majestic old lunch boxes:

blox

line 

blox1

line

The interior of a vintage box.

box15

line

blox2

line

blox3

line

blox4

When buying a Roy Rogers and Dale Evans box on the right, included was a toy horse. It goes by the name Trigger.

line

blox5

line

blox6

line

blox7

line

blox10

line

Not sure where this one came from.

box22


Posted December 25, 2016 by markosun in Art, History

Poli-Sport Cartoons   Leave a comment


line

keg

line

keg10

line

keg1

keg2

keg3

keg12

keg4

keg8

keg9

line

keg11

keg13

Toronto Maple Laughs

 

keg16

line

keg15

line

keg14

line

MAILMASTER Moudakis Cartoon Subject: Cartoon On 2014-07-23, at 3:00 PM, Moudakis, Theo wrote:  Moudakis July 24 2014.jpg


Posted December 19, 2016 by markosun in Art

Looney Toons   Leave a comment


line

Donald’s cabinet positions are starting to fill up. He has appointed a climate change skeptic as head of the Environmental Protection Agency, and the head of oil giant Exxon-Mobile as Secretary of State. Trump called the big oil guy a great deal maker. With the Donald it’s all about deal making. Government in the U.S. is going to be run like a multi-national Fortune 500 company. Good or bad, have to wait and see.

line

cag

cag8

cag1

cag3

cag4

Donald doesn’t believe the CIA when it says it has very good evidence that the Russians hacked American political parties during the election campaign. If you don’t believe your own intelligence agency, who are you going to believe?

line

cag5

cag6

cag9

Changing subjects

baddy2

line

Eventually Trump is going to have to deal with this psycho sociopath.

kim


Posted December 14, 2016 by markosun in Art

Giant Presidential Heads   Leave a comment


Saw this on Ozzy and Jack’s World Detour.

prez3

line

 

In Croaker, Virginia stands a sight that would make just about anyone stop in their tracks. 43 ghostly effigies of presidents past crowd together in the tall grass. Some of the 18-to-20-foot busts have crumbling noses. Tear-like stains fall from the eyes of others. All have bashed-in heads to some degree. This could be a scene from the world’s most patriotic horror movie, but it’s all too real—and Howard Hankins’ family farm is just the latest stop on the busts’ larger-than-life journey from iconic pieces of art to zombie-like markers of America’s past.

prez
line
line

The busts are all that remains of Virginia’s Presidents Park, a now-defunct open-air museum where visitors could once walk among the presidential heads. Presidents Park first opened in nearby Williamsburg in 2004, the brainchild of local landowner Everette “Haley” Newman and Houston sculptor David Adickes, who was inspired to create the giant busts after driving past Mount Rushmore in South Dakota.

But their presidential visions soon (literally) went bust. The park, which cost about $10 million to create, went belly-up due to a lack of visitors in 2010. Doomed in part by location—it was hidden behind a motel and slightly too far away from colonial Williamsburg’s tourist attractions, the park went into foreclosure.

That’s where Hankins, who helped build the park, comes in. Before the land was auctioned off, Newman asked him to destroy the busts. But Hankins didn’t feel right about it, and instead offered to take the heads and move them to his 400-acre farm. And so began the laborious process of moving 43 giant presidents, each weighing in between 11,000 and 20,000 pounds, to a field ten miles away. Hankins estimates the weeklong process cost about $50,000—not including the damage done to each sculpture during the move.

line

prez1

line

prez2

line

headz


Posted December 10, 2016 by markosun in Art, Bizarre